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IN THE NEWS: Hoosiers catching on to Rep. Braun’s support for dismantling coverage for Hoosiers with pre-existing conditions

INDIANAPOLIS – 1.1 million Hoosiers under 65 with pre-existing conditions are watching with fear as a lawsuit to destroy their coverage protections proceeds, and they know that Rep. Braun supports the suit too. A new article Wednesday from Talking Points Memo details how the vastly unpopular lawsuit, brought by the Justice Department, the State of Indiana, and nearly 20 other states, is proving to be a massive drag on Republican candidates like Rep. Braun.

Rep. Braun can continue to claim that he supports these protections in an obvious attempt to slow the damage being caused by this latest GOP assault on Indiana health care. Having seen him support the lawsuit and every other GOP attempt to dismantle pre-existing conditions protections while failing to offer a support a single concrete proposal that would retain them, however, Hoosiers aren’t fooled.

From Talking Points Memo: Anti-Obamacare Lawsuit Threatens To Drag Down GOP In The Midterms

A lawsuit filed by 20 GOP-controlled states and supported by the Trump administration could end up becoming a serious liability for Republican candidates this November. The suit seeks to gut the remainder of the Affordable Care Act, and will go before a conservative Texas federal judge in early September, just two months before voters go to the polls to decide which party controls the House, the Senate, and dozens of influential state and local seats.

“There’s no good time for GOP candidates to be arguing that they want coverage for pre-existing conditions to be unconstitutional,” David Bergstein, the national press secretary of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC), told TPM. “But doing so in September ensures it will be fresh on people’s minds when they vote.”

The lawsuit has been called “absurd,” “frivolous” and “ludicrous” by legal experts, even those who have supported past challenges to the ACA. Essentially, the 20 Republican attorneys general are arguing that the individual mandate is so integral to Obamacare that, because Congress repealed it last year, the rest of the health care reform law has to go too.

Democratic campaigns and national groups are doing everything they can to remind voters of those stakes and blast their GOP opponents — both those whose names are on the lawsuit, like Hawley and Morrisey, and those who have voiced support for it, like Indiana Senate nominee Mike Braun and North Dakota Senate candidate Kevin Cramer.

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