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IN THE NEWS: Rep. Braun doesn’t seem to share Hoosier farmers’ mounting concerns over tariffs

INDIANAPOLIS – Rep. Braun told Hoosier farmers who are worried that their profits from crops will be wiped out by tariffs that they should let President Trump’s tariff policy “play itself out” at Monday’s Ag Policy Summit.

A report from Indiana Public Media on Monday’s event noted that Rep. Braun only discussed tariffs when he was forced to do so in front of Hoosier farmers who are gravely concerned about the Trump Administration’s decision to impose corn and soybean tariffs that are causing crop prices to plummet. When pressed about the impact of tariffs, he instructed farmers to “take a leap of faith” even as the tariffs continue to bite. Meanwhile, Joe Donnelly “addressed the tariffs directly” and made clear that he’ll continue defending Hoosier farmers in the Senate because he shares their concerns about the new tariffs.

From Indiana Public Media: Indiana’s U.S. Senate Candidates Talk Tariffs, Trade

Candidates for Indiana’s U.S. Senate seat courted Hoosier corn and soybean farmers during an agricultural summit Indiana’s Soybean Alliance and the Indiana Corn Growers Association hosted Monday.

The impacts of tariffs coupled with strong crop yields across the nation have caused prices to plummet more than $2 per bushel.

Senator Joe Donnelly (D-Indiana) addressed the tariffs directly. He says farmers cannot afford to suffer any longer. He worries future tariffs could cause prices to drop even further.

“We don’t have that time,” he says. “We don’t have the luxury of $3.45 corn. We don’t have the luxury of $8.50 beans, when it costs over $9.00 to put a crop in the field.”

Republican Senate candidate Mike Braun did not mention tariffs during his prepared remarks, but touched on them when asked. He says he trusts President Trump and urges voters to do the same.  However, Braun insists he will stand up to the President if the situation fails to improve. “It’s not a simple issue, but it’s a simple process of letting it play itself out,” Braun says. “I trust President Trump. He knows the significance—especially here in Indiana—of the farm community and other places that are feeling the short-term pain.”

The 25 percent Chinese soybean tariff comes in response to the Trump Administration’s tariff on Chinese steel. The U.S. has a list of imported Chinese goods that could incur additional tariffs.

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